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5. Automounter Examples

These examples were taken from TCP/IP Network Admin by Craig Hung, published by O'Reilly and Associates

5.1 Solaris Automounter

For comparason, for those of you that understand Solaris' NFS automounter,

Master Map file

The Master Map configuration file is read by automount. It lists all the map files used by the automounter.

#
# Sample /etc/auto_master ( equivalent of /etc/auto.master in linux )
# ------ these Solaris options are NOT necessarily compatible with linux' autofs
#
#       Excerpted from TCP/IP Network Administration, Chap 9
#
# mount_point   map_name        options
#
# comment out if you use NIS+ and centrally maintained files
#+auto_master
#
# Does not apply if you use DNS
#/xfn           -xfn
#
# All machines listed in /etc/hosts are automatically mounted
# ( a subdirectory ) under /net
/net            -hosts          -nosuid
#
# directories listed in /etc/auto_home is mounted under /home
/home           auto_home
#
# special mount point defined by direct map file
/-              auto_direct
#
# end of file

Indirect Map file

An Indirect map configuration file lists the pathnames and relative mount points, /home in this case

#
# Sample /etc/auto_home
# ------ these Solaris options are NOT necessarily compatible with linux' autofs
#
#       Excerpted from TCP/IP Network Administration, Chap 9
#
# comment out if you use NIS+ and centrally maintained files
#+auto_home
#
user_1  mach_1:/export/home/user_1
user_2  mach_2:/export/home/user_2
user_3  mach_3:/export/home/user_3
#
# Export all the users home directory in Server 
*       Server:/export/home/&
#
# end of file

Direct Map files

#
# Sample /etc/auto_direct ( Direct map file )
# ------ these Solaris options are NOT necessarily compatible with linux' autofs
#
#       Excerpted from TCP/IP Network Administration, Chap 9
#
#
# mount it read/write
/home/research  -rw     filbert:/home/research
#
#
# mount it read only and soft timeout
# if  pecan does not respond in a specified period, use almond
# if almond does not respond in a specified period, user filbert
#
/usr/man        -ro,soft        pacan,almond,filbert:/usr/share/man
#
# end of file

5.2 Amd Automounter Files

amd is another popular automounter and I shall briefly describe it's files for similarity

The amd related binaries and files are:

        /usr/sbin/amd           amd binary
        /etc/amd.conf           amd config file
        /etc/rc.d/init.d/amd    amd startup script
        /.automount             temporary directory to manage the mount points
        /var/log/messages       log files ( depends on your syslog.conf )

/etc/amd.conf

#
# Sample /etc/amd.conf
# ------ these amd configurations are NOT necessarily compatible with linux' autofs
#
#       see man pages for more info, "man amd.conf"
#
# To reload changes to this file
# ------------------------------
#       /etc/rc.d/init.d/amd stop ; /etc/rc.d/init.d/amd start
#
#
/defaults       opts:=rw;type=nfs
#
# where you have your home directory
home            type:=nfs;rhosts:=home;rfs:=/home
#
# where you have your incoming emails
mail            type:=nfs;rhosts:=mail;rfs:/var/spool/mail
#
# Replace with the server you have access to
#
server1         type:=nfs;rhosts:=server1;rfs:=/server1
server2         type:=nfs;rhosts:=server2;rfs:=/server2
server3         type:=nfs;rhosts:=server3;rfs:=/server3
#
# end of file

/.automount Amd Automounter Directory tree

/.automount is your mount point, and is managed by the amd automount daemon.

The name of the moint point directory used is defined by the -a option

root# /usr/sbin/amd -a /.automount ....

And, you must make sure that the directory exists

root# mkdir /.automount

Please do NOT add or delete links, files, sub-directories from this direcotry

amd will create subdirectories for "mount points" for the servers

root# ls -l /.automount
        /.automount/server1
        /.automount/server2
        /.automount/server3

/net

amd will create links to the /.automount directory

Please do NOT create these links...amd will do it dynamically for you...

root# ls -la /net
        server1 -> /.automount/server1
        server2 -> /.automount/server2
        server3 -> /.automount/server3

Amd arguments

Usually amd is invoked by

root# /etc/rc.d/init.d/amd stop
root# /etc/rc.d/init.d/amd start

The default arguments are:

root# /usr/sbin/amd -a /.automount -l syslog -c 1000 /net /etc/amd.conf

-a /.automount defines the temporary directory to manage the mount points

-l syslog tells amd to log all messages via syslogd

-c 1000 tells amd to cache the remote host's filesystem for 1000 seconds

/net tells amd to put it's links here

/etc/amd.conf tells amd where to find it's config files

To Check on the status of amd

# amq -ms

To have amd automount two directories that was manually mounted.

Excerpted from Net-2/3-HOWTO

To mount two nfs filesystems using your /etc/fstab file you would use two entries that looked like:

       server-1:/export/disk  /nfs/server-1  nfs  defaults
       server-2:/export/disk  /nfs/server-2  nfs  defaults

i.e. you are nfs mounting server-1 and server-2 onto your linux disk on the /nfs directory as /nfs/server-1 and /nfs/server-2.

After commenting out, or deleting the above lines from your /etc/fstab file, you could amd to perform the same task with the following syntax:

  /etc/amd -x all -l syslog -a /amd -- /nfs /etc/amd.server
  |      | |    | |       | |     |  | |  | |             |
  |      | |    | |       | |     |  | |  | |             |
  `------' `----' `-------' `-----' -' `--' `-------------'
  |        |      |         |      |   |    |
  (a)      (b)    (c)       (d)    (e) (f)  (g)

Where:

        a. The full amd binary path (obviously optional) depending on your
           $PATH setting, so just `amd' may be specified here.

        b. `-x all' means turn full logging on. Read the documentation for the
           other logging levels

        c. `-l syslog' means log the message via the syslog daemon. This could
           mean put it to a file, dump it, or pass it, to an unused tty
           console. This (syslog) can be changed to the name of a file, i.e.
           `-l foo' will record to a file called foo.

        d. `-a /amd' means use the /amd directory as a temporary place for
           automount points. This directory is created automatically by amd
           and should be removed before starting amd in your /etc/rc scripts.

        e. `--' means tell getopt() to stop attempting to parse the rest of
           the command line for options. This is especially useful when
           specifying the `type:=' options on the command line, otherwise
           getopt() tries to decode it incorrectly.

        f. `/nfs' is the real nfs mount point. Again this is automatically
           created and should not generally contain subdirectories unless the
           `type:=direct' option is used.

        g. The amd map (i.e. a file) named `amd.server' contains the lines:

Example /etc/amd.server file

#
# Sample /etc/amd.server
# ------ these amd configurations are NOT necessarily compatible with linux' autofs
#
/defaults    opts:=rw;type:=nfs
#
server-1     rhost:=server-1;rfs:=/export/disk
server-2     rhost:=server-2;rfs:=/export/disk
#
# AutoMount the remote Home Server home directory
home    host!=HomeSrvr;type:=nfs;rhost:=HomeSrvr;rfs:=/home
#
# AutoMount the remote Mail Server mail directory
mail    host!=MailSrvr;type:=nfs;rhost:=MailSrvr;rfs:=/var/spool/mail
#
# end of file

Starting the amd Automounter

        root# /etc/rc.d/init.d/amd stop

        root# /etc/rc.d/init.d/amd start        - or -
        root# /etc/rc.d/init.d/amd reload 

        Check the log files and the status of the amd automounter

                root# /etc/rc.d/init.d/amd status
                root# cat /etc/mtab
                root# amq -ms
                root# df
                root# showmount -e
                root# tail -100 /var/log/messages

Your amd log messages ( /var/log/messages ) could look like:

        #
        # I do NOT know what "old syntax" it's complaining about...
        #
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[865]: key /defaults: Old syntax selector found: type=nfs
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[865]: key /defaults: Old syntax selector found: type=nfs=
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[865]: skipping selector to ""
        #
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[865]: file server remote.your_domain.com type nfs starts up
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[865]: Flushed /net/remote; dependent on remote.your_domain.com
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[21970]: linux mount: type nfs
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[21970]: linux mount: version 1
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[21970]: linux mount: fd 8
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[21970]: linux mount: hostname www.xxx.yyy.zzz
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[21970]: linux mount: port 2049
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[21970]: linux mount: fsname remote:/
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[21970]: linux mount: type (mntent) nfs
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[21970]: linux mount: opts rw
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[21970]: linux mount: dir /.automount/remote
        Aug 17 08:28:02 HomeSrv amd[865]: remote:/ mounted fstype nfs on /.automount/remote

Now if you say:

root# ls /nfs

you should see no files. However the command:

root# ls /nfs/server-1

will mount the host `server-1' automatically. voila amd is running.

After the default timeout has expired, this will automatically be unmounted.

Your /etc/password file could contain entries like:

       ...
       linus:EncPass:10:0:God:/nfs/server-1/home/linus:/bin/sh
       mitch:EncPass:20:10:Mitch DSouza:/nfs/server-1/home/mitch:/bin/tcsh
       matt:EncPass:20:10:Matt Welsh:/nfs/server-1/home/matt:/bin/csh

which would mean that when Linus, Matt, or Mitch are logged in, their home directory will be remotely mounted from the appropriate server and unmounted when they log out.

5.3 Autofs Files

Autofs Automounter Binaries and Config Files

The autofs related binaries and files are:

        /usr/sbin/automount     autofs binary
        /etc/auto.master        master file
        /etc/auto.misc          map file
        /etc/rc.d/init.d/autofs         autofs startup script
        /usr/lib/autofs         autofs libraries
        /lib/modules/Kernel.Version/fs/autofs.o autofs loadable module
        /.autofs                temporary directory to manage the mount points
        /var/log/messages       log files ( depends on your syslog.conf )
        
        Note: Kernel.Version will vary on your system, eg: 2.0.35 for linux-2.0.35

NOTE: Sometimes the autofs startup script is at /etc/rc.d/rc.autofs

Autofs Automounter Directory tree

/.autofs

This is your temporary mount directory, its contents are managed my the automount daemon, autofs.

Please do NOT add or delete links, files, sub-directories from this direcotry

This top level directory name is defined in /etc/auto.master If the desired top level directory does not exit, please create it.

root# mkdir /.autofs

/etc/auto.master Autofs files

For more info and example, man auto.master

This file is read by the autofs startup scripts usually at boot time to determine the mount points of the automounted file system. The autofs script can be stop and started at anytime to reload a new mount point.

        --
        -- autofs does NOT reload nor restart if the mounted directory ( eg: /home ) is busy
        --

In the example below, /.autofs is the mount point and /etc/auto.misc is the map file defining the options for the mount point.

#
# Sample /etc/auto.master file
# ------
#
#       see man pages for more info, "man autofs.master"
#
# To Reload Changes to this file
# ------------------------------
#       /etc/rc.d/init.d/autofs stop ; /etc/rc.d/init.d/autofs start
#
#
# format of this file:
# mountpoint map options
# For details of the format, look at autofs(8)
#
/.autofs /etc/auto.misc --timeout 60
#
# end of file

/etc/auto.misc Autofs Mount Map File

auto.misc is your mount point map file. It defines all your partions you want the automounter to mount and unmount for you and where to mount it onto your filesystem.

A brief description of the mount point options used in the example below:

        -ro     read only from the remote host

        -soft   if the remote host is unavailable,
                return an error and don't retry after the timeout period expired

        -hard   if the remote host is unavailable,
                retry until it does respond
                - be careful that hard mounts does NOT causes slow network and hung systems
                ( use it in conjunction with -intr or be readily available to check
                ( on the network status

        -intr   allows the keyboard interrupts to kill the process that is hung 
                waiting for the remote host to respond

        -bg     do the retries in background mode
        -fg     do the retries in foreground mode

        -fstype defines your file system type
                ext2            for linux native,
                iso9660         for cdroms,
                nfs             for NFS mounted filesystem

Note that the CDROM have a ??? syntax to mount it as needed.

Note that kernel is a fully qualified domain name while home, mail uses local host names without the DomainName.com

CAUTION: When defining /home directories and partitions, please be aware of /home from your remote server IS being mounted over your local /home directory already on your machine. Typically, people use /home/users for mounting users or /u or /export/home to avoid confusion.

When the automounter is properly loaded and running, it will manage some directories in it's temporary mount dirctory /.autofs.

#
# Sample /etc/auto.misc
# ------
#
# To Reload Changes to this file
# ------------------------------
#       /etc/rc.d/init.d/autofs stop ; /etc/rc.d/init.d/autofs start
#
# To see the Status and log messages
# ----------------------------------
#       /etc/rc.d/init.d/autofs status
#       tail -100 /var/log/messages
#
#
kernel    -ro,soft,intr       ftp.kernel.org:/pub/linux
#
cdrom     -fstype=iso9660,ro  :/dev/cdrom
#
#floppy   -fstype=auto    :/dev/fd0
floppy    -fstype=ext2    :/dev/fd0
#
# Define your Home directory ( server )
#       CAUTION: /home vs the local /home already on your system
home      -fstype=nfs     home:/home
#
# hard mounted, keep trying to connect to the Mail server
mail      -fstype=nfs     mail:/var/spool/mail
#
#
# Define some backups disk on a different machine
#
#       soft -- timeout and give up the server is unavailable
#
Backup_1  -fstype=nfs,soft    mach1:/Backup
Backup_0  -fstype=nfs,soft    mach2:/Backup
#
#
# Try to mount mach1 first, if that fails, try mach2
# Backup  -fstype=nfs     mach1,mach2:/Backup   ??? is it supported ??
#
#
# To implement "/net -hosts" form from Solaris automounter:
#
# *     -soft,bg,intr           &:/
#
#
# To automount your WinNT box
#
WinNT_C -fstype=smbfs,login=your_id,passwd=xxxxxx    WinNT:/C
#
# end of file

Additional AutoFS Examples

Excerpted from autofs mailing list, submitted by Peter Anvin (hpa@transmeta.com)

To have autofs automount your remote hosts

        #
        # Sample  auto.master
        # ------
        #
        /auto           auto.auto
        #
        # end of file

        #
        # Sample auto.auto
        # ------
        #
        host1           -fstype=autofs  file:/etc/auto.host1
        host2           -fstype=autofs  file:/etc/auto.host2
        host3           -fstype=autofs  file:/etc/auto.host3
        #
        # end of file

(If you're using something else than file maps, substitute with yp:auto.host1 or whatever.)

If you have options for the various host maps, add them after the -fstype argument (e.g. -fstype=autofs,ro) or add them to the entries in the individual host maps (probably preferred, then you can control them per individual mount point, too.)

For expires to work properly you need a recent 2.1.x kernel.

Additional Submount Examples

Two excerpted from autofs mailing list by Richard Henderson (rth@cygnus.com)

The following fragment allows /nfs/host/disk to work automatically, assuming it is exported from the host from /host/disk. This is the configuration we have at Cygnus.

        #
        # Sample /etc/auto.master
        # ------
        #
        /nfs    /etc/autofs/nfs         rw,intr,rsize=8192,wsize=8192
        #
        # end of file

        #
        # Sample /etc/autofs/nfs
        # ------
        # ... some exceptions to the rule ...
        #
        *       -fstype=autofs,-Dhost=&,-Dprefix=/&     file:/etc/autofs/nfs.sub
        #
        # end of file

        #
        # Sample /etc/autofs/nfs.sub
        # ------
        #
        *       ${host}:${prefix}/&
        #
        # end of file

Another Submount Example and Explanation submitted by Rainer Clasen clasen@unidui.uni-duisburg.de

A submount is a subdirectory of the automount point, or more precisely: A submount generates a new automount sublevel beneath the current one.

Syntax:
=======
syntax for submounts in sun-style maps:

<key>  -[other options,]fstype=autofs[,other options]   <maporigin>:<mapname>

 <key>          the name of the subdirecctory
 <maporigin>    how you retrieve your maps: file, yp, nisplus, hesiod,
                program
 <mapname>      for filemaps a full path eg. /etc/auto.cd, for yp the
                mapname eg. auto.cd

in addition to [,other options] submounts seem to inherit the map options.

Submount Example 2a 
===================

I want my cdroms accessible as /vol/cd/<x>

Top level automount watches /vol. I define "cd" as submount. If somebody does an "ls /vol/cd" autmount mkdirs /vol/cd and starts a new automount watching /vol/cd. Somebody accesses /vol/cd/1 and the new automount could try to mount one of my cdroms.

        # /etc/auto.master
        /vol    /etc/auto.vol
        # end of file

        # /etc/auto.vol
        #
        # Hrm, I want all my cdroms in a subdirectory, I don't like calling em cdrom0
        #
        cd      -fstype=autofs          file:/etc/auto.cd
        # end of file

        # /etc/auto.cd
        0       -fstype=iso9660,ro      :/dev/scd0
        1       -fstype=iso9660,ro      :/dev/scd1
        # end of file

Submount Example 2b
===================

Basic idea borowed from Richard Henderson (rth@cygnus.com)

I want all hosts' filesystem accessible as as /net/<host>/<fs> .

This needs all hosts exporting their fs's as /disk/<fs> . I can think of two ways to acomplish this: either mount them as /disk/<fs>, or make /disk/<fs> a symlink to the real mountpoint ( At least you'll need a symlink root -> / ).

Top level automount watches /net. It's map has a wildcard key (*) to avoid unneccessary typing. To avoid needing one map for each host I define a variable with the hostname (ie. the looked up key).

        # /etc/auto.master
        /net    /etc/auto.net
        # end of file

        # /etc/auto.net
        *       -fstype=autofs,-Dhost=&         file:/etc/auto.netsub
        # end of file

        # /etc/auto.netsub
        *                                       ${host}:/disk/&
        # end of file

Richard's original assumes each host offers its filesystems as /<hostname>/<fs> . It uses another variable named prefix to store that /<hostname> part. My example matches Richard's with a hardwired prefix of /disk.

some Notes:
===========
- you can always put some exceptions above the wildcard entry
- & is replaced with te key used to lookup
- variables become more important with submounts
- there is no variable substitution within the key

I encountered two bugs while playing with submounts. See my other post for a patch.

Converting direct -> indirect map translation script

Excerpted from autofs mailing list, submitted by Justin Hahn (jehahn@raven.bu.edu)

The systems I administrate are mostly Sun Workstations. Lately we've been adding a few Linux Workstations, and I realized I had an autofs problem. Last I checked autofs didn't handle direct maps. However 99% of our NFS mounts are handled by a direct map distributed by NIS. I've created the following perl script as a QUICK hack around the problem. I'd like suggestions on improving it. It appears to work, although I'm not sure about what automount wants to be given. I know that if I just give it the mount point it works, but I'd like to be able to pass options. I haven't checked the source yet to check out what I could be passing instead, but I will soon.

Again any comments you can give me are seriously appreciated.

--- BEGIN auto_direct_map.pl

        #!/usr/bin/perl
        use strict;
        #
        # Globals
        #
        my $YPCAT = "/usr/bin/ypcat";
        my $MAPNAME = "auto_direct";
        # NONE!
        #
        # main block - keep it all in one nice neat place
        #
        main: {
            my (%opts, %mounts)=();
            my ($i,$j,$k)=();
            #
            if(scalar(@ARGV) != 1) {
                exit(0); #Just die quietly. Users shouldn't call us.
            }
            #
            open(FILE, "$YPCAT -k $MAPNAME|") 
                or die("Can't fork $YPCAT. Contact Admin.");
            #
            while(defined($_=<FILE>)) {
                ($i,$j,$k)=split();
                $i =~ s[^/][];
                $opts{$i}=$j if($i);
                $mounts{$i}=$k if($i);
            }
            #
            # How do we add the options, etc. in?.... hmmm...
            #
            printf("%s\n",$mounts{$ARGV[0]}) if($mounts{$ARGV[0]});
            close(FILE);
            #
            exit(0);
        } # end main

AutoFS w/ NIS+ style automaster file

These patches were excerpted from the mailing lists or submitted to me and I have NOT tested these. Please let me know if there is any clarification of changes required.

Larry Augustine's NIS & autofs rc patch is available at AutoFS.NIS.ScriptPatches

Michel Lespinasse's NIS & autofs rc script is available at AutoFS.NIS.sh

        Note: The filename extension is ._sh so that you can view/click it

Additional Samba Example

Samba allows linux servers to read/write files on Microsoft PCs running WFW, Win95, Win98, WinNT. It is available from http://samba.anu.edu.au/samba

Excerpted from autofs mailing list, submitted by Peter Kudrat (kundrat@gw.gic.sk)

        #
        # Sample automounting for Samba filesystem ( Win95/Win98/WinNT )
        # ------
        #       ( add these to /etc/auto.misc )
        #
        #       see http://www.wittsend.com/mhw/smbmount.html for converting
        #       linux-2.0.x/smbfs to linux-2.1.x/samba compatible options
        #
        sys       -fstype=smbfs,login=your_id,passwd=xxxxxx    ://WinNT/System
        data      -fstype=smbfs,login=your_id,passwd=xxxxxx    ://WinNT/Data
        #
        # end of file

and checking the log file ( /var/log/messages ) will show something like:

        ...
        Aug 29 12:32:43 brana automount[325]: attempting to mount entry /WinNT/users
        Aug 29 12:32:43 brana automount[11139]: lookup(file): looking up users
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: lookup(file): users -> -fstype=smbfs,login=yyyy,passwd=xxx://WinNT/Users
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: expanded entry: -fstype=smbfs,login=yyyy,passwd=xxxx^I^I://WinNT/Users
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: parse(sun): gathered options: fstype=smbfs,login=yyyy,passwd=xxxx
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: parse(sun): core of entry: //WinNT/Users
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: do_mount //WinNT/Users /WinNT/users type smbfs options login=yyyy,passwd=xxxx using module smbfs
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: mount(smbfs): calling mkdir /WinNT/users
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: >> Added interface ip=194.1.129.233 bcast=194.1.129.233 nmask=255.255.255.255
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: >> Server time is Sat Aug 29 12:32:36 1998
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: >> Timezone is UTC+2.0
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: >> Domain=[GICNET] OS=[Windows NT 4.0] Server=[NT LAN Manager 4.0]
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: >> security=user
        Aug 29 12:32:44 brana automount[11139]: mount(smbfs): mounted //WinNT/Users on /WinNT/users

/Net Network Directory

NOTE: Do NOT create any files or directories in /.autofs

All files and links are created by the automounter. This directory is defined in /etc/auto.master.

All the entries in /etc/auto.misc will be subdirectories relative to /.autofs

        If you wish to access directories and files on another server:
                root# cd /Net

                root# ln -s ../.autofs/Server1 .
                root# ln -s ../.autofs/Server2 .

        Create your links for your users home directory ( /home/$USER ):

                root# cd /
                root# ln -s .autofs/home .

        Create your links for incoming emails:

                root# cd /var/spool
                root# ln -s ../../.autofs/mail .

        When you run the following command, you should see the contents
        of the automounted filesystem

        To view the mail mount point
                root# ls -l /var/spool/mail

        To view the contents of the mail server
                root# ls -l /var/spool/mail/

        To view the Servers on your local LAN
                root# ls -l /Net/*

        To compare timestamps, sizes on the passwd files
                root# ls -l /Net/*/etc/passwd

Starting and stopping the automounter

        ---
        --- WARNING: do NOT stop the automount daemon if you have any directories
        ---      automounted at the time such as /home, /var/spool/mail, etc
        ---
        --- autofs daemon will not reload nor restart itself...therefore no
        --- new filesystems, partitions can be mounted...

        To stop the daemon
                root# /etc/rc.d/init.d/autofs stop

        To start the daemon
                root# /etc/rc.d/init.d/autofs start
        
        To stop and start the daeon with one command
                root# kill -HUP "pid_of_the_autofs_daemon"  ( automount )

        Check the log files and the status of the autofs automounter

                root# /etc/rc.d/init.d/autofs status
                root# cat /etc/mtab
                root# df
                root# showmount -e
                root# tail -100 /var/log/messages


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